ARTIST IN RESIDENCE

In September we will welcome Genevieve Memory as our next resident artist. In the coming months we look forward to sharing more about Genevieve and the exciting projects that she has planned for SQ.

GENEVIEVE MEMORY

Genevieve Memory's interdisciplinary visual arts practice is centred around portraiture and self-portraiture, her overarching themes being identity and the mind. She also works in composing, curation and arts writing.

Her interest in trans-disciplinary mark-making and in challenging traditional visual art codes and conventions is paralleled by her belief that people have more in common than in difference.

Genevieve's expanded practice combines painting and sculpture with fabric and textiles to create hybrid art objects imbued with poetic resonance; her textural colour field abstractions explore the inner workings of the mind; and her contemporary tonal realist portraits tell the stories of everyday people through an egalitarian lens.

The semiotics of the dress, Genevieve's rolling project, challenges viewers to reconsider rigid gender and identity boundaries in contemporary society by interrogating the sign-value of women’s clothing and its relationship to gender bias. Many theorists including Eco, Barthes and Wilson have proposed that clothing functions as a system of signs, or a kind of language. By using women’s clothing in her practice, she aims to engage viewers in a discussion about what it means to identify or be identified as a woman, non-binary or other person today.  This work is important in the broader context because gender equality for women has not been achieved in Australia - women and girls of all identities continue to face disadvantage and discrimination due to persisting conscious and unconscious biases, evidenced by realities such as the widening gender pay gap. 
 
Genevieve argues that clothing and textiles are universal, transcending cultural boundaries, and that through the concept of absence presence and with a hint of the uncanny, the women's clothing she uses stands in for the women themselves.